Trachycarpus fortunei

Chusan Palm

(10 customer reviews)

7L
£29.50

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30/35L
£125.00

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35L
£135.00

Only 2 left in stock

55L 50/60 Stem
£149.50

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55L 70/80 Stem
£199.00

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55L 80/90 Stem
£235.00

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70L 90/100 Stem
£259.50

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110L
£585.00

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200cm Trunk
£575.00

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250cm Trunk
£675.00

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15L 20cm Trunk
£59.50

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15L 40cm Trunk
£89.50

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90-100cm Trunk
£199.00

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70-80cm Trunk
£199.00

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Multi trunk
£59.50

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80-90cm Trunk
£235.00

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Eventual Plant Size

Description

 

Trachycarpus fortunei, the Chusan Palm, Chinese Windmill Palm or just Windmill Palm, as they are often called, is without doubt the most important palm suitable for cooler temperate gardens.  Here in the U.K Trachycarpus fortunei or ‘Trachys’ as we like to call them are indeed truly hardy palms tolerating the vagaries of the U.K climate with ease; flourishing and even flowering and producing viable seed quite happily.  

 

If like me you enjoy a tropical or colonial look to your garden, Trachys are an absolutely essential addition. Suitable for a range of varying conditions from shady to full sun positions, Trachycarpus fortunei is at home. A useful evolutionary development is that Trachycarpus naturally grow on wooded hillsides from China to India, through to the Japanese islands where when young, the baby palms grow in shady conditions amongst the forest canopy only to burst into sunshine as they mature, gaining heights against their leafy neighbours.  Occurring as it does in hilly or mountainous regions, Trachys are often subject to high rainfall and of course cold winters hence their inherent hardiness and adaptability for us gardeners.  

 

Here in West Sussex, we grow many Trachycarpus in the ground in our heavy, brick-making, wet in winter, dry in summer clay with huge success, with palms often achieving 30-40cm of trunk growth in a single season.  

 

We’ve had so much success in fact that we now grow some of our Trachycarpus commercially in the ground, ready to be lifted and potted for sale when the time comes.  As for cultivation, with all palms (and this goes for other species we grow here) the key is to give them the best possible start when planting in your garden.  We recommend adding well-rotted organic compost to the prepared ground, at least a 50/50 mix with your existing soil.  Make sure that you carefully plant your palm at the same level as the compost in the container.  Never plant deeper, in fact, if in doubt, plant a little higher.  Planting is best undertaken when the soil is warm, late spring through to early autumn.  

 

Once planted water in well to settle the ground, a dilute seaweed feed helps here to hasten root development.  Then leave alone for six months or so, only watering in extremely dry conditions.  If you would like subsequent rapid growth, palms are gross feeders during late spring through to summer and Trachycarpus in particular are always hungry.  Personally, I use organic fertilisers, so in spring, each of my Trachys gets a couple of handfuls of pelleted poultry manure (tip: wear gloves!).  If they’re in a really special spot, an extra handful in July gives a super boost, as does the occasional feed of liquid seaweed.  

 

It’s also worth mentioning that like many palms, Trachycarpus are dioecious which means they are single sex, either male or female (and occasionally in between). The males produce great swathes of sulphur yellow tiny flowers each summer whilst the females produce larger drupes of pale yellowish-green flowers which after a hot summer develop into hundreds of pea-sized, kidney shaped grey-black seeds.  

 

I’m not going to describe a Trachycarpus here, I’ve included lots of photos – if you haven’t seen one in the flesh, a photo speaks a thousand words.  Just to say – Trachycarpus are a single stem palm with one growing point producing large palmate leaves supported by the familiar hairy trunk.  The hairiness is in fact the fibrous bases of each leaf petiole (stem) and to my mind add insulation, protecting the trunk from the elements.  The fibre can be removed, in Asia, it is harvested and woven into heavy cloth or rope.  The exposed trunk continues to develop, apparently with no ill effect but for me personally, I prefer the naturally furry and cuddly look.  

 

Trachycarpus, being a single trunk palm can become quite tall, eight to fifteen metres or so after many many years.  As a guide here at the nursery garden, after ten years, we have palms ranging from 2m trunks up to some approaching 3.5M.  I’ve found that young palms tend to grow rapidly up to 2-3m then slow down reducing altitude and concentrating on flowering and reproduction, slowly gaining height as new leaves are produced each year.  

 

I could go on as I love Trachys but one final point, please consider where you plant your Trachy.  Allow it space for the future, and avoid really windy locations as the large leaves look sad when wind-scorched and bashed.  

 

 

 

Eventual Size: Up to 5 metres in height   

Position: Full sun to full shade but out of strong winds

Foliage: Evergreen

Habit: Hairy brown trunk topped with dark green fan leaves

Soil: All soils, but avoid waterlogged areas; drought tolerant once established

Synonym: Chamaerops excelsa, Chamaerops fortunei

Common Names: Chinese windmill palm, windmill palm, Chusan palm, hemp palm, Nepalese fan palm

Hardyness:H5 – Hardy in most places throughout the UK even in severe winters (-15 to -10)

Growth rate (UK): 15cm-30cm of trunk growth per year

Common Names: Chusan Palm

  • Eventual Size:Up to 5 metres in height
  • Position:Full sun to full shade but out of strong winds
  • Foliage:Evergreen
  • Habit:Hairy brown trunk topped with dark green fan leaves
  • Soil:All soils, but avoid waterlogged areas; drought tolerant once established
  • Synonym:Chamaerops excelsa, Chamaerops fortunei
  • Common Names: Chinese windmill palm, windmill palm, Chusan palm, hemp palm, Nepalese fan palm
  • Hardyness:H5 - Hardy in most places throughout the UK even in severe winters (-15 to -10)
  • Growth rate (UK):15cm-30cm of trunk growth per year

10 reviews for Trachycarpus fortunei

  1. peter.r.currie (verified owner)

    Peter

    Great palm, delivered quickly. Really pleased, thank you.

  2. k harris

    Have been shopping here for a few years now, love the place and the staff are very helpful.and now with an added bonus of a tea rooms, I go just for a cuppa and enjoy the surroundings.

  3. Vanessa Connell-Thompson

    Very knowledgeable and helpful staff when discussing what type of tree would suit a coastal garden. Great service and efficient delivery. Fabulous trees – a trachycarpus fortunei and eucalyptus. Will definitely buy more trees for the front garden in the new year.

  4. Steven Potter

    Very fast delivery, impressed with items purchased – would buy from again. S.Potter

  5. Graham

    Small problem with order but issue professionally dealt with/pleased with overall outcome, would use in future

  6. James

    Amazing company! my chusan palms have arrived bigger than was stated. I found your nursery from your youtube video and will recommend you to my friends and family. I wish you all the best and will see you at hampton court!

  7. Don

    Thanks again Big Plant, today I received my large specimen fortunei and it looks amazing. Also my dwarf ‘Waggy’ arrived with it and looks like its little sibling!

  8. Brian Jones

    Much larger than I expected, would thoroughly recommend. Fast delivery.

  9. Chris Paterson

    Extremely pleased with my palm, arrived in great condition, very fast delivery and well packed , will be purchasing another from you!

  10. Jan P

    Bought two of these from you. Arrived promptly and in great condition, quick delivery too – Would use again!

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